Retirement rewards

Common planning mistakes lead to an opaque future

With increasing life expectancy and rising cost of living, the need to plan for one’s golden years is essential. Although retirement is one of the most distant financial goals, it is in our own interest not to ignore it. And almost three quarters (73%) of people aged 45 or over are longing for the day when their life is no longer confined by their working routine, according to new research[1].

Planning for a bigger retirement income

Looking forward to having more time to explore faraway places

Today, with more Britons living longer and healthier lives, the concept of retirement is much different to what it was only one generation ago. For each retiree, retirement is different. Perhaps you’re looking forward to having more time to explore faraway places, or maybe you dream of simply waking up each day and doing whatever takes your fancy.

Easing into retirement

Older workers are increasingly valuable members of the gig workforce

We tend to associate young people with the gig economy, but new research shows that older, more skilled workers are increasingly making the move. The gig economy has been enthusiastically embraced by millennials who favour the flexibility it offers, although it appears that it is older workers who might be benefiting the most.

One in eight will retire with no pension in 2018

Excuses to avoid facing the difficult work of saving for retirement

Retirement is one of our biggest financial challenges. As with any daunting challenges we face, we tend to think up excuses so we can avoid facing the difficult work of saving for retirement. Worryingly, nearly one in eight people retiring this year (12%) have made no provision for their retirement, including 10% who will either be totally or somewhat reliant on the State Pension, according to new research[1].

Is inflation back? Don’t panic

How to protect the value of your money from its effects

Is inflation back? After two years when consumer prices in the UK barely rose, the annual rate of inflation has risen above the Bank of England’s (BOE) target of 2% in 2017. The combination of high inflation and limited wage growth – as well as uncertainty about the terms on which Britain will leave the European Union in 2019 – is expected to mean Britain’s economy grows more weakly than other EU economies this year.